Children as young as 12 risk becoming drug mules: Police warn that vulnerable youngsters are being enslaved by the ‘county lines’ menace

A campaign is aiming to warn how children as young as 12 get involved with crime
Authorities are concerned that children are used to transport drugs and money
County lines phenomenon involves urban gangs branching out from the city
By CHRIS GREENWOOD FOR THE DAILY MAIL

PUBLISHED: 19:12 EDT, 23 July 2018 | UPDATED: 19:26 EDT, 23 July 2018
Police are appealing for help rescuing vulnerable children enslaved by the ‘county lines’ drug menace.

A new campaign aims to raise awareness of how those as young as 12 get caught up in the criminal underworld.

The authorities are increasingly concerned that children are being used to transport drugs and money.
Authorities are concerned that children are used to transport drugs and money

The county lines phenomenon involves urban gangs branching out from their city strongholds to find lucrative new markets in smaller cities and towns.

Some youngsters are being forced to work as ‘mules’ by threats of violence against them and their families.

Crimestoppers is now urging anyone concerned for the safety of a child to contact it anonymously.

 

Police warn top grammar school headmaster that one of his…

British intelligence agencies and police use CHILD spies in…

A place for your crew: Stunning Georgian five-bed Trafalgar…

Officials said warning signs could include seeing young people in shopping centres or on public transport or high streets during school hours.

Other signs could be young people seeming unfamiliar with an area, appearing to be intimidated by a controlling figure or deliberately avoiding police.

The charity said residents might also notice that a property is being used by drug dealers if it attracts frequent callers, often at antisocial hours.

Emily van der Lely, of Crimestoppers, said: ‘We know the term “county lines” might not be widely recognised, which is why we are launching this campaign.

‘We need help to put a stop to this exploitation and the damage that these criminals are inflicting on our communities and those being taken advantage of.’

As part of its campaign, Crimestoppers is sending advertising vans to some of the areas hardest hit by county lines networks. The charity is working closely with the Home Office, which is warning frontline staff to watch out for evidence of young people being exploited.

Big city gangs use a dedicated phone number – the so-called county line – to control the supply of drugs.

In many cases young footsoldiers are recruited to travel to new areas and sell drugs before returning with the profits.

The method is hugely profitable, with each phone number generating up to £3,000 a day in drug deal turnover.

 

Support Rollie, like you viewers keep PBS alive PayPal.me/RollieQuaidcom Bitcoin: qrk7qz2h3nr3kax22cxh7m8qsyy9demt2ynt5ql75y https://discord.gg/R9CfwGD Every great magic trick consists of three parts or acts. The first part is called "The Pledge". The magician shows you something ordinary: a deck of cards, a bird or a man. He shows you this object. Perhaps he asks you to inspect it to see if it is indeed real, unaltered, normal. But of course... it probably isn't. The second act is called "The Turn". The magician takes the ordinary something and makes it do something extraordinary. Now you're looking for the secret... but you won't find it, because of course you're not really looking. You don't really want to know. You want to be fooled. But you wouldn't clap yet. Because making something disappear isn't enough; you have to bring it back. That's why every magic trick has a third act, the hardest part, the part we call "The Prestige"." patreon.com/Rollie_Quaid https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB-BQKpAVgKeNmBVgaDvehQ/videos?view_as=subscriber Explore the Mind’s 🧠 👁 Eye

0 comments on “Children as young as 12 risk becoming drug mules: Police warn that vulnerable youngsters are being enslaved by the ‘county lines’ menace

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: